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Me, Myself and AI – Latest in Grayling Advantage Series Identifies Communications Risks and Opportunities with Advancements in Artificial Intelligence Technology

6th June 2017


The potential advantages gained through the incorporation of artificial intelligence and automation into different industries will only be achieved if companies consider communications alongside the technology. That is the core theme running throughout a new compilation of viewpoints from AI experts, produced by communications agency, Grayling. 

 

Me, Myself and AI combines the perspectives of a number of international experts in their respective fields, be they industry leaders and innovators, scientists, academics, commentators or tastemakers, with additional input from some of Grayling’s own experts in reputation management and public affairs. These viewpoints have been compiled into a digital magazine published today (01 June 2017) as part of Grayling’s ‘Advantage Series’, a research and insights program that addresses some of the major reputational, regulatory and communication challenges facing organizations today.

 

Grayling’s global head of strategic services, Jon Meakin edited the report. He says: “AI is transforming the way we work, live and interact with companies, public sector organizations, and each other, opening up myriad opportunities, but also creating risks. And while we are making no claims to be experts in the field of AI, it is our job to understand the potential advantages that may accrue from the effective communication of such advancements – and the risks. This publication is intended to contribute to and advance the debates that AI has sparked within our clients’ industries.”

 

Me, Myself and AI is divided into three chapters:

 

Work: How the application of AI is likely to transform different industries; the ways in which the communication of that poses reputational risks and opportunities; the opposition that the adoption of this technology will prompt in some quarters; and how this might be overcome.

  • So… are we all going to be replaced by robots? Steve Abrams of IBM Watson sets out some of the changes happening today that will impact all our tomorrows
  • Automation and the workforce: What’s the real challenge? Bob Doyle of the Association for Advancing Automation considers the impacts on the workforce of the AI revolution
  • Advances in occupational robotics – promise and concerns for human worker safety John Howard of the National Institute for the Occupational Safety and Health says new regulations will be required to protect those working alongside robots in the future
  • Caution! Crisis ahead Grayling’s Rebecca Gudgeon looks to the technological innovations of the past for lessons about managing reputational risks that may come with companies embracing AI.

 

Live: How the application of Artificial Intelligence is going to change the way we interact with each other, as well as with brands, corporations and public bodies, day to day; the tools we use; and the implications for professional marketers and communicators, as well as media organizations.

  • The road ahead Grayling’s Vicky El-Kassir considers the implications for automotive marketing in the age of driverless cars
  • The final frontier? Software engineer and innovator, Ian Webster is using AI to map asteroids
  • (Artificial) life imitating art New York artist, Stephanie Dinkins addresses the racial and other sociodemographic implications of developments in AI
  • Game changer Sports app, theScore is using bots to create a whole new user experience. Riaz Lanai explains
  • AI and the media New York Times contributing technology writer, Eric Taub on the implications of increased use of AI in the media

 

Govern: While Artificial Intelligence is unlikely to replace flesh and blood politicians, its roll-out in different areas will be subject to political will. What implications does this longstanding tension between innovation and regulation have for AI, for the companies responsible, and for the people and industries whose lives it promises (or threatens) to transform? And could government actually lead the way?

  • Rise of the robots Vivien Zuzok of Grayling’s policy team in Brussels on how the EU plans to up its legislative game to keep pace with AI 
  • At your service While technology companies are currently making all the running, Grayling’s Kathryn Ager believes one of the biggest areas of potential for AI is in the delivery of public services

 

Vivien Zuzok, Consultant at Grayling Brussels who wrote the piece on AI in EU policy, said: “The emerging EU policy debate is multifaceted and political, given the complexity of AI technologies, the broad gamut of public and private sectors affected, and the sweeping implications for economies and societies,” said Vivien Zuzok With Brexit, EU elections in 2019, and a nervous Europe faced with security threats and economic uncertainty, a clear policy direction and concrete legislative action under this EU mandate (2014-2019) is possible, but a challenge.

 

Me, Myself and AI may be viewed at www.grayling.com.


Grayling Team

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